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3D Printing a Xeno-coRPus

3D Printing a Xeno-coRPus

Koen Boonen, who works in HR and prevention at Materialise made a wonderfully arty and geometric piece called Xeno-coRPus using i.materialise. The model cost 44 Euro to make using Zcorp 3D printing.

“This model is an adaptation of the Julia-fractal in a xenodream metamorph. I optimised the mesh in Cinema4D, created some renderings, and the result was so appealing that I simply had to have this object! The i.materialise result is stunning: it is heavier than expected and has the look and feel of a rough stone sculpture.

The object now fills the void in my living room like an alien artifact: wonderful and strange…

Koen”


A 3D Printed Individualized Fluid Vase

Supabold’s FluidVase is one of the most beautiful things ever made with i.materialise. This fully customizable art object lets you take falling and colliding water and turn that into a vase. You can learn about the Fluid Vase here or play with the online tool on the Supabold site here.

Choose your container, choose where you want to pour, determine how much water you would like and watch the water dance. Replay the clear animation and select your favorite frame. This frame can now become a real object thanks to 3D printing. The 3D printing process used is Selective Laser Sintering. Each Fluid vase will be different but the size can be up to 9.5cm by 9.5 cm by 21 cm. The Fluid Vase costs $560 (399 Euro).

When designer Fung Kwok Pan first made this with us we were thrilled. When we saw his fun interaction & design tool we were happier still. Our happiness turned to pride when DesignBoom, PSFK, Wired, FastCoDesign and many other publications joined in a chorus of approval fo

3D Printing the TulipK Lamp

Ben Geebelen’s TulipK lamp is Laser Sintered in polyamide. The pattern of the lamp was designed in Excel and the file was prepared in 3-matic. The lamp opens and closes through an ingenious mechanism that acts as a 3D printed dimmer for the lamp. Ben tells us about the TulipK in his own words below.

TulipK is a lamp shade I designed as a present to my wife. Its shape is inspired by a picture of tulips we had on our wedding invitation. I designed it fully in 3-matic and Excel (yes, I consider that design software too).

The shade has 6 tulip petals surrounding the light bulb. It includes a mechanism to make the flower open up. The petals are attached with hinges to a ring that is suspended from the ring attached to the light socket. Each petal has a small rod that slides through a slot in the latter ring. If you rotate the first ring with respect to the other, the rods slide through the slots and are pushed outward, making the petals open up. The idea was to have some kind